Skip to main content

Associations involving delays (particularly long delays) between certain weather parameters and geomagnetic activity

Abstract

Four sunspot-minimum periods (1963–1966, 1971–1977, 1983–1987 and 1992–1997) have been examined for the results which are presented. Using several different weather parameters, tropospheric gravity waves, enhanced cold fronts and two rainfall data sets in Eastern Australia, associations at reasonably high levels of significance have been found with enhanced geomagnetic activity (EGA). Statistically this EGA involved either short delays of several days or long delays of about 20 days. The geomagnetic parameters used were (a) the AE index (b) the hourly H component for a number of stations and (c) the daily K p -sum value. The K p -sum analyses have shown that the EGA associated with the delays form part of four or five cycles of recurrent geomagnetic activity for 27-day periodicities. Furthermore statistically two recurrent cycles are found to exist concurrently, one apparently related to the short delays and the other to the long delays. Periodicities of 13.5 days are created because the two sets are displaced from each other by approximately this interval. A brief reference is made to the 13.5 periodicity known to exist for geomagnetic activity and the evidence in the literature for active regions on the sun to be displaced by 180 degrees of solar longitude.

References

  1. Bowman, G. G., Atmospheric pressure waves at Brisbane and their association with certain ionospheric and solar events, Proceedings of AGARD Conference No. 115, 15–1, 1972.

  2. Bowman, G. G., Associations between tropospheric gravity waves and enhanced geomagnetic over three sunspot-minimum periods, Indian J. of Radio Space Phys., 29, 1–8, 2000.

    Google Scholar 

  3. Bowman, G. G. and I. K. Mortimer, Quantitative estimates of relationships between geomagnetic activity and equatorial spread-F as determined by TID occurrence levels, Earth Planets Space, 52, 451–458, 2000.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  4. Bowman, G. G. and K. L. Shrestha, Tropospheric atmospheric gravity waves and their relationship with geomagnetic activity, Indian J. Radio Space Phys., 27, 110–118, 1998.

    Google Scholar 

  5. Bucha, V. and V. Bucha, Jr., Geomagnetic forcing of changes in climate and in the atmospheric circulation, J. Atmos. Solar-Terr. Phys., 60, 145–169, 1998.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  6. Croxton, F. E. and D. J. Cowden, Applied general statistics, 2nd ed., 749 pp., Pitman, London, 1955.

    Google Scholar 

  7. Donnelly, R. F. and L. C. Puga, Thirteen-day periodicity and the center-to-limb dependence of UV, EUV, and X-ray emission of solar activity, Solar Physics, 130, 369–390, 1990.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  8. Duell, B. and G. Duell, The behavior of barometric pressure during and after solar invasions and solar ultraviolet invasions, Smithsonian Micell. Collections, 110(8), 1–34, 1948.

    Google Scholar 

  9. Mursula, K. and B. Zieger, The 13.5 day periodicity in the Sun, solar wind, and geomagnetic activity: The last three solar cycles, J. Geophys. Res., 101, 27,077–27,090, 1996.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  10. Pap, J., W. K. Tobiska, and S. D. Bouwer, Periodicities of solar irradiance and solar activity indices, I., Solar Physics, 129, 165–189, 1990.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  11. Roberts, W. O. and R. H. Olson, Geomagnetic storms and wintertime 300 mb trough development in the Pacific-North American area, J. Atmos. Sci., 30, 135–140, 1973.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  12. Svensmark, H. and E. Friis-Christensen, Variation of cosmic ray flux and global cloud coverage—a missing link in solar-climate relationships, J. Atmos. Solar-Terr. Phys., 59, 1225–1232, 1997.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  13. Taylor, J. R., M. Lester, and T. K. Yeoman, Seasonal variations in the occurrence of geomagnetic storms, Ann. Geophysicae, 14, 286–289, 1996.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  14. Tinsley, B. A., Solar wind modulation of the global electric circuit and apparent effects on cloud microphysics, latent heat release, and tropospheric dynamics, J. Geomag. Geoelectr., 48, 165–175, 1996.

    Article  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to G. G. Bowman.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Bowman, G.G., Mortimer, I.K. Associations involving delays (particularly long delays) between certain weather parameters and geomagnetic activity. Earth Planet Sp 53, 959–968 (2001). https://doi.org/10.1186/BF03351693

Download citation

Keywords

  • Geomagnetic Storm
  • Geomagnetic Activity
  • Cold Front
  • Weather Parameter
  • Rainfall Level