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Ice velocities of the Lambert Glacier from static GPS observations

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Abstract

Between 1988 and 1995, five seasons of Global Positioning System (GPS) data were collected at seventy-three locations near the 2500 metre contour of the Lambert Glacier Drainage Basin (LGB). These data have been processed using GAMIT/GlobK software to determine surface velocities at the surveyed sites. Results show that velocities along the traverse route vary between 0.5 ma−1 and 63 ma−1 with the location of the major outlet glaciers inside the LGB clearly identifiable within the data. A subset of the LGB GPS data has been studied to investigate an efficient method for determination of ice velocities at remote sites within a single field season. Results from this study have shown that ice velocities within 2% of the long-term estimate may be determined using two to four hour GPS site occupations separated in time by a minimum of forty days.

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Correspondence to Rachael Manson.

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Keywords

  • Global Position System
  • Global Position System Data
  • Cycle Slip
  • Outlet Glacier
  • Global Position System Site