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Table 1 Mass loss (wt.%) as a function of temperature for the CI and CI-like chondrites.

From: Characterising the CI and CI-like carbonaceous chondrites using thermogravimetric analysis and infrared spectroscopy

Sample   25–200 °C 200–400 °C 300–800 °C 800–1000 °C Total mass loss (25–1000 °C) H2O (200–800 °C) H (wt.%)
Ivuna Ivu-1 8.5 5.1 15.4 1.8 29.0 18.7 2.1
  Ivu-2 7.9 5.1 15.4 1.9 28.5 18.7 2.1
  Average 8.2 5.1 15.4 1.8 28.7 18.7 2.1
Orgueil Org-2 10.8 5.6 15.3 2.2 31.8 18.7 2.1
  Org-3 9.1 5.3 14.4 2.0 28.9 17.8 2.0
  Average 10.0 5.5 14.8 2.1 30.3 18.3 2.0
Y-82162 Y-82 (a) 6.1 2.2 4.6 2.4 14.5 5.9 0.7
  Y-82 (b) 6.0 2.2 5.0 1.5 13.8 6.3 0.7
  Average 6.1 2.2 4.8 2.0 14.1 6.1 0.7
Y-980115   9.0 3.2 6.3 1.6 18.8 8.1 0.9
  1. Most mass loss occurs between 25 and 800 °C, and the DTG curves are divided into different temperature regions related to dehydration of terrestrial adsorbed H2O (25–200 °C) and the dehydration and dehydroxylation of Fe-(oxy)hydroxides (200–400 °C) and phyllosilicates (300–800 °C). We determine the abundance of H2O in the CI and CI-like chondrites by assuming that all the mass loss between 200 and 800 °C is H2O (see “H2O abundances in CI chondrites” section)